Senate takes another stab at privacy law with proposed COPRA bill

A serious woman listens during a hearing.

Enlarge / Sen. Maria Cantwell during a Senate Finance Committee hearing on Aug. 22, 2018. (credit: Al Drago | Bloomberg | Getty Images)

Perhaps the third time’s the charm: a group of Senate Democrats, following in the recent footsteps of their colleagues in both chambers, has introduced a bill that would impose sweeping reforms to the current disaster patchwork of US privacy law.

The bill (PDF), dubbed the Consumer Online Privacy Rights Act (COPRA), seeks to provide US consumers with a blanket set of privacy rights. The scope and goal of COPRA are in the same vein as Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which went into effect in May 2018.

Privacy rights “should be like your Miranda rights—clear as a bell as to what they are and what constitutes a violation,” Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.), who introduced the bill, said in a statement. Senators Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), Ed Markey (D-Mass.), and Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) also co-sponsored the bill.

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